Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/58258
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dc.contributor.authorda Rocha, Maira [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorMendonca Ferraz, Renata Caroline [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorChen, Vitor Guo [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorMoreira, Gustavo Antonio [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorFujita, Reginaldo Raimundo [UNIFESP]
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-01T13:21:26Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-01T13:21:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.09.017
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. Clare, v. 102, p. 148-153, 2017.
dc.identifier.issn0165-5876
dc.identifier.urihttps://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/58258-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To evaluate the evolution of polysomnographic parameters of children with Down syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to adenotonsillectomy and the interaction of comorbidities on therapeutic outcome. Methods: Ninety patients with Down syndrome and habitual snoring were identified between 2005 and 2015 in a Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Clinic. Parent's complaints were evaluated by the test of equality of two proportions. Wilcoxon test was used to examine pre- and post-operative polysomnographic differences. Mann-Whitney test evaluated the influence of comorbidities. A p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 27 patients met the inclusion criteria (55.6% patients were males; mean (SD) age were 6.7 (3.6) years (range, 1.5-16 years). Significant improvement of parent's complaints (p < 0.001), arousal index (p = 0.045), and minimum oxygen saturation were observed post-adenotonsillectomy (p = 0.034). Adenotonsillectomy was able to resolve obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in 29.6% of children with Down syndrome. Nineteen patients (70.4%) remained with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and 44.4% showed a reduction of at least 50% of obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Central apnea index post-adenotonsillectomy was worse in patients with heart disease (p = 0.022). Sleep efficiency (p = 0.031), N1 sleep stage (p = 0.001), apnea-hypopnea index (p = 0.023), and central apnea index (p = 0.008) were worse after surgery in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with severe OSAS showed significant improvement in polysomnographic parameters after surgery. Conclusion: Although adenotonsillectomy improved symptoms and objective sleep data in children with Down syndrome, it was not able to resolve obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in most patients. Congenital heart diseases and hypothyroidism may affect the outcome. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en
dc.description.sponsorshipAssociacao Fundo de Incetivo a Pesquisa - AFIP
dc.format.extent148-153
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal Of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
dc.rightsAcesso restrito
dc.subjectSleep apnea syndromeen
dc.subjectDown syndromeen
dc.subjectHeart septumen
dc.subjectAdenoidectomyen
dc.subjectTonsillectomyen
dc.subjectPalatine tonsilen
dc.titleClinical variables determining the success of adenotonsillectomy in children with Down syndromeen
dc.typeArtigo
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Sao Paulo, Rua Pedro Toledo 947, BR-04039002 Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Sao Paulo, Dept Psychobiol, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Sao Paulo, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Rua Pedro Toledo 947, BR-04039002 Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnifespUniv Fed Sao Paulo, Rua Pedro Toledo 947, BR-04039002 Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnifespUniv Fed Sao Paulo, Dept Psychobiol, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnifespUniv Fed Sao Paulo, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Rua Pedro Toledo 947, BR-04039002 Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.09.017
dc.description.sourceWeb of Science
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000415777600029
dc.coverageClare
dc.citation.volume102
Appears in Collections:Artigo
Artigo

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