Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/56959
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dc.contributor.authorDiniz-Filho, Alberto
dc.contributor.authorAbe, Ricardo Y.
dc.contributor.authorZangwill, Linda M.
dc.contributor.authorGracitelli, Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorWeinreb, Robert N.
dc.contributor.authorGirkin, Christopher A.
dc.contributor.authorLiebmann, Jeffrey M.
dc.contributor.authorMedeiros, Felipe A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-31T12:47:38Z-
dc.date.available2020-07-31T12:47:38Z-
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.07.006
dc.identifier.citationOphthalmology. New York, v. 123, n. 10, p. 2058-2065, 2016.
dc.identifier.issn0161-6420
dc.identifier.urihttps://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/56959-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To evaluate the relationship between intraocular pressure (IOP) and rates of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness change over time measured by spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT). Design: Observational cohort study. Participants: The study involved 547 eyes of 339 patients followed up for an average of 3.9 +/- 0.9 years. Three hundred eight (56.3%) had a diagnosis of glaucoma and 239 (43.7%) were considered glaucoma suspects. Methods: All eyes underwent imaging using the Spectralis SD OCT (Heidelberg Engineering GmbH, Heidelberg, Germany), along with IOP measurements and standard automated perimetry (SAP). Glaucoma progression was defined as a result of "Likely Progression" from the Guided Progression Analysis software for SAP. Linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationship between average IOP during follow-up and rates of RNFL thickness change, while taking into account potential confounding factors such as age, race, corneal thickness, and baseline disease severity. Main Outcome Measures: The association between IOP and rates of global and sectorial RNFL thickness loss measured by SD OCT. Results: Forty-six eyes (8.4%) showed progression on SAP during follow-up. Rates of global RNFL thickness change in eyes that progressed by SAP were faster than in those that did not progress (-1.02 vs. -0.61 mu m/year, respectivelyen
dc.description.abstractP = 0.002). For progressing eyes, each 1-mmHg higher average in IOP during follow-up was associated with an additional average loss of 0.20 mu m/year (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.08 to 0.31 mm/yearen
dc.description.abstractP < 0.001) of global RNFL thickness versus only 0.04 mu m/year (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.07 mu m/yearen
dc.description.abstractP = 0.015) for nonprogressing eyes. The largest associations between IOP and rates of RNFL change were seen for measurements from the temporal superior and temporal inferior sectors, whereas the smallest association was seen for measurements from the nasal sector. Conclusions: Higher levels of IOP during follow-up were associated with faster rates of RNFL loss over time measured by SD OCT. These findings support the use of SD OCT RNFL thickness measurements as biomarkers for the evaluation of the efficacy of IOP-lowering therapies to slow down the rate of disease progression. (C) 2016 by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Eye Institute (NEI) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Health and Human Services (HHS)
dc.format.extent2058-2065
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier Science Inc
dc.relation.ispartofOphthalmology
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Meeting of the American-Academy-of-Ophthamology
dc.rightsAcesso restrito
dc.titleAssociation between Intraocular Pressure and Rates of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Loss Measured by Optical Coherence Tomographyen
dc.typeArtigo
dc.description.affiliationUniv Calif San Diego, Dept Ophthalmol, Hamilton Glaucoma Ctr, 9500 Gilman Dr, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Minas Gerais, Dept Ophthalmol & Otorhinolaryngol, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Sao Paulo, Dept Ophthalmol, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Alabama Birmingham, Dept Ophthalmol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA
dc.description.affiliationColumbia Univ, Med Ctr, Harkness Eye Inst, New York, NY USA
dc.description.affiliationUnifespDepartment of Ophthalmology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.sponsorshipIDNEI NIH HHS: P30 EY022589
dc.description.sponsorshipIDNEI NIH HHS: R01 EY021818
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.07.006
dc.description.sourceWeb of Science
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000389509100004
dc.coverageNew York
dc.citation.volume123
dc.citation.issue10
Appears in Collections:Artigo

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