Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/49689
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dc.contributor.authorHoffmann, Mauricio Scope
dc.contributor.authorLeibenluft, Ellen
dc.contributor.authorStringaris, Argyris
dc.contributor.authorLaporte, Paola Paganella
dc.contributor.authorPan, Pedro Mario [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorGadelha, Ary [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorManfro, Gisele Gus
dc.contributor.authorMiguel, Euripedes Constantino [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorRohde, Luis Augusto
dc.contributor.authorSalum, Giovanni Abrahao
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-21T10:30:18Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-21T10:30:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2015.10.013
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Academy Of Child And Adolescent Psychiatry. New York, v. 55, n. 1, p. 47-53, 2016.
dc.identifier.issn0890-8567
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/49689-
dc.description.abstractObjective: This study examines the extent to which children's positive attributes are distinct from psychopathology. We also investigate whether positive attributes change or "buffer" the impact of low intelligence and high psychopathology on negative educational outcomes. Method: In a community sample of 2,240 children (6-14 years of age), we investigated associations among positive attributes, psychopathology, intelligence, and negative educational outcomes. Negative educational outcomes were operationalized as learning problems and poor academic performance. We tested the discriminant validity of psychopathology versus positive attributes using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and propensity score matching analysis (PSM), and used generalized estimating equations (GEE) models to test main effects and interactions among predictors of educational outcomes. Results: According to both CFA and PSM, positive attributes and psychiatric symptoms were distinct constructs. Positive attributes were associated with lower levels of negative educational outcomes, independent of intelligence and psychopathology. Positive attributes buffer the negative effects of lower intelligence on learning problems, and higher psychopathology on poor academic performance. Conclusion: Children's positive attributes are associated with lower levels of negative school outcomes. Positive attributes act both independently and by modifying the negative effects of low intelligence and high psychiatric symptoms on educational outcomes. Subsequent research should test interventions designed to foster the development of positive attributes in children at high risk for educational problems.en
dc.description.sponsorshipConselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq)
dc.description.sponsorshipFundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)
dc.format.extent47-53
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier Science Inc
dc.relation.ispartofJournal Of The American Academy Of Child And Adolescent Psychiatry
dc.rightsAcesso aberto
dc.subjectnoncognitive skillsen
dc.subjectyouth strengths inventoryen
dc.subjectinteractionen
dc.subjectschoolPsychiatric-Disordersen
dc.subjectMental-Disordersen
dc.subjectSkill Formationen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectAttainmenten
dc.subjectPersonalityen
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectStrengthsen
dc.titlePositive Attributes Buffer the Negative Associations Between Low Intelligence and High Psychopathology With Educational Outcomesen
dc.typeArtigo
dc.description.affiliationHCPA, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Rio Grande do Sul, BR-90035003 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationNIMH, Sect Bipolar Spectrum Disorders, Intramural Res Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA
dc.description.affiliationNIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA
dc.description.affiliationKings Coll London, Inst Psychiat, London WC2R 2LS, England
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Sao Paulo, UNIFESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationNatl Inst Dev Psychiat Children & Adolescents, INCT CNPq, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Rio Grande do Sul, HCPA, BR-90035003 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationINCT CNPq, Brasilia, DF, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Sao Paulo, INCT CNPq, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Sao Paulo, Inst Psychiat, Sao Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Rio Grande do Sul, HCPA, INCT CNPq, BR-90035003 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUniv Fed Rio Grande do Sul, BR-90035003 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationINCT CNPq, Brasilia, DF, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnifespUniversidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (UNIFESP)
dc.description.sponsorshipIDCNPq: 573974/2008-0
dc.description.sponsorshipIDFAPESP: 2008/57896-8
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jaac.2015.10.013
dc.description.sourceWeb of Science
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000367121500009
Appears in Collections:Artigo

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