Red blood cell alloimmunization in sickle cell disease: the influence of racial and antigenic pattern differences between donors and recipients in Brazil

dc.contributor.authorMoreira Junior, Gilberto [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorBordin, Jose Orlando [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorKuroda, Akemi [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorKerbauy, José [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-24T11:40:33Z
dc.date.available2016-01-24T11:40:33Z
dc.date.issued1996-07-01
dc.description.abstractRed blood cell (RBC) transfusions are widely used in the management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, repeated RBC transfusions are often complicated by RBC alloimmunization. To investigate whether the frequency of RBC alloimmunization could be accounted for by racial and RBC phenotype differences between donors and recipients in Brazil, in this study we compared the RBC phenotype of 100 SCD patients with that observed in 120 randomly selected blood donors. A comparison of the RBC phenotype between the two groups revealed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of the C antigen in the donor population (P < 0.01), but no significant difference was observed for the A, B, D, c, E, e, K, k, Fy(a), M, N, S, s, and Jk(a) antigens. Using standard techniques (indirect antiglobulin test, enzyme treatment, and low-ionic-strength solution) we observed an RBC alloimmunization rate of 12.9% (11/85) in the SCD patients. Fifteen alloantibodies were detected in 11 patients, and most (80%) involved antigens in the Rhesus and Kelt systems. This observed RBC alloimmunization rate in SCD patients in Brazil is lower than that reported by studies from North America, suggesting that the requirement for extended antigen-matched RBC transfusion for SCD patients in the setting of a RBC phenotype concordant donor-recipient population may not be cost-effective in some countries. (C) 1996 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en
dc.description.affiliationUNIV FED SAO PAOLO,ESCOLA PAULISTA MED,DISCIPLINA HEMATOL & HEMOTERAPIA,BR-04023999 São Paulo,BRAZIL
dc.description.affiliationUnifespUNIV FED SAO PAOLO,ESCOLA PAULISTA MED,DISCIPLINA HEMATOL & HEMOTERAPIA,BR-04023999 São Paulo,BRAZIL
dc.description.sourceWeb of Science
dc.format.extent197-200
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1096-8652(199607)52:3<197
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Hematology. New York: Wiley-liss, v. 52, n. 3, p. 197-200, 1996.
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1096-8652(199607)52:3<197
dc.identifier.issn0361-8609
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/25607
dc.identifier.wosWOS:A1996UY81400013
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Hematology
dc.rightsAcesso aberto
dc.rights.licensehttp://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-406071.html
dc.subjectsickle cell diseaseen
dc.subjectalloimmunizationen
dc.subjectred-cell antigensen
dc.subjectblood transfusionen
dc.titleRed blood cell alloimmunization in sickle cell disease: the influence of racial and antigenic pattern differences between donors and recipients in Brazilen
dc.typeArtigo
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