Enteroviruses in X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia: Update on Epidemiology and Therapy

Enteroviruses in X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia: Update on Epidemiology and Therapy

Author Bearden, David Google Scholar
Collett, Marc Google Scholar
Quan, P. Lan Google Scholar
Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Sullivan, Kathleen E. Google Scholar
Abstract X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) has been associated with a broad range of infections, but enteroviral disease represents one of the most damaging infections. The risk of enteroviral infection in XLA is lower now than in the setting of intramuscular immunoglobulin or in patients without immunoglobulin replacement, but the rate of infection has not declined significantly in the era of intravenous immunoglobulin replacement. Enteroviruses can cause inflammation of nearly every organ, but in XLA, infections often manifest as dermatomyositis or chronic meningoencephalitis. Difficulty and delay in recognizing symptoms and lack of specific therapy contribute to the poor outcomes. Furthermore, cerebrospinal fluid detection of enteroviruses is not very sensitive. Reluctance to perform brain biopsies can lead to significant delays. The other feature compromising outcomes is the lack of specific therapy. High-dose peripheral and intraventricular immunoglobulin have been used, but failure is still common. New antienteroviral drugs are in development and show promise for immunodeficient patients with life-threatening infections with enterovirus. (C) 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.
Keywords Agammaglobulinemia
Enterovirus
Coxsackievirus B5
Polio
Pleconaril
Pocapavir
Meningoencephalitis
xmlui.dri2xhtml.METS-1.0.item-coverage Amsterdam
Language English
Sponsor Jeffrey Modell Foundation
UpToDate
Baxter
Date 2016
Published in Journal Of Allergy And Clinical Immunology-In Practice. Amsterdam, v. 4, n. 6, p. 1059-1065, 2016.
ISSN 2213-2198 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Elsevier Science Bv
Extent 1059-1065
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2015.12.015
Access rights Closed access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000389613300004
URI https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/56796

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