Effect of sequential intermittent pneumatic compression on both leg lymphedema volume and on lymph transport as semi-quantitatively evaluated by lymphoscintigraphy

Effect of sequential intermittent pneumatic compression on both leg lymphedema volume and on lymph transport as semi-quantitatively evaluated by lymphoscintigraphy

Author Miranda Junior, Fausto Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Perez, Maria Del Carmen Janeiro Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Castiglioni, Mario Luiz Vieira Google Scholar
Juliano, Yara Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Amorim, Jorge Eduardo de Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Nakano, Luis Carlos Uta Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Barros, Newton de Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Lustre, Wellington Gianoti Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Burihan, Emil Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Institution Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Abstract Sequential Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (SIPC) is an accepted method for treatment of peripheral lymphedema. This prospective study evaluated the effect in 11 patients of a single session of SIPC on both lymphedema volume of the leg and isotope lymphography (99Tc dextran) before SIPC (control) and 48 hours later after a 3 hour session of SIPC. Qualitative analysis of the 2 lymphoscintigrams (LS) was done by image interpretation by 3 physicians on a blind study protocol. The LS protocol attributed an index score based on the following variables: appearance, density and number of lymphatics, dermal backflow and collateral lymphatics in leg and thigh, visualization and intensity of popliteal and inguinal lymph nodes. Volume of the leg edema was evaluated by measuring limb circumference before and after SIPC at 6 designated sites.Whereas there was a significant reduction of circumference in the leg after SIPC (p<0.05), there was no significant difference in the index scores of the LS before and after treatment. This acute or single session SIPC suggests that compression increased transport of lymph fluid (i.e., water) without comparable transport of macromolecules (i.e., protein). Alternatively, SIPC reduced lymphedema by decreasing blood capillary filtration (lymph formation) rather than by accelerating lymph return thereby restoring the balance in lymph kinetics responsible for edema in the first place.
Language English
Date 2001-09-01
Published in Lymphology. Tucson: Lymphology, v. 34, n. 3, p. 135-141, 2001.
ISSN 0024-7766 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Lymphology
Extent 135-141
Origin https://journals.uair.arizona.edu/index.php/lymph/article/view/17304
Access rights Open access Open Access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000170738900004
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/11600/44863

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