Sleep and epilepsy: Exploring an intriguing relationship with a translational approach

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dc.contributor.author Matos, Gabriela [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.author Tufik, Sergio [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.author Scorza, Fulvio A. [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.author Cavalheiro, Esper A. [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.author Andersen, Monica L. [UNIFESP]
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-24T14:31:20Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-24T14:31:20Z
dc.date.issued 2013-03-01
dc.identifier http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2012.12.003
dc.identifier.citation Epilepsy & Behavior. San Diego: Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science, v. 26, n. 3, p. 405-409, 2013.
dc.identifier.issn 1525-5050
dc.identifier.uri http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/36040
dc.description.abstract The relationship between sleep and epilepsy has been well established. There is a high prevalence of sleep disturbances in epilepsy, which are associated with a decreased quality of life of individuals with epilepsy. in view of this fact, preclinical research is necessary to address many gaps in knowledge. for instance, it is well known that sleep deprivation can trigger seizures; however, this is a complex pathophysiological event. in this context, there are many valuable animal models of epilepsy that reproduce clinical symptoms and can be used. Investigations using animal models that simulate clinical epilepsy are imperative. Furthermore, preclinical studies that reveal mechanisms related to sleep-epilepsy interactions are very important. Results of such studies can, in turn, improve the understanding of epilepsy itself and can be useful in developing new antiepileptic drugs and preventive measures to control seizures. Preclinical research should be performed using a translational framework with experimental designs that can lead to advances in the quality of life of individuals with epilepsy. in view of the fact that more than 50 million of people are affected by epilepsy around the world, understanding the relationship between sleep and epilepsy is imperative.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled the Future of Translational Epilepsy Research. (c) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. en
dc.description.sponsorship Associacao Fundo de Incentivo a Pesquisa
dc.description.sponsorship Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq)
dc.description.sponsorship Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)
dc.format.extent 405-409
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier B.V.
dc.relation.ispartof Epilepsy & Behavior
dc.rights Acesso restrito
dc.subject Sleep en
dc.subject Sleep disturbance en
dc.subject Epilepsy en
dc.subject Preclinical research en
dc.subject Rodents en
dc.title Sleep and epilepsy: Exploring an intriguing relationship with a translational approach en
dc.type Resenha
dc.rights.license http://www.elsevier.com/about/open-access/open-access-policies/article-posting-policy
dc.contributor.institution Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
dc.description.affiliation Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Dept Psicobiol, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliation Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Dept Expt Neurol, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnifesp Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Dept Psicobiol, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationUnifesp Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Dept Expt Neurol, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
dc.description.sponsorshipID FAPESP: 10/15110-8
dc.description.sponsorshipID FAPESP: 12/05396-7
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.yebeh.2012.12.003
dc.description.source Web of Science
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000316663900025



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