Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorArbeloa, Ana
dc.contributor.authorBlanco, Miguel
dc.contributor.authorMoreira, Fabiana C. [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorBulgin, Richard
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Cecilia
dc.contributor.authorDahbi, Ghizlane
dc.contributor.authorBlanco, Jesus E.
dc.contributor.authorMora, Azucena
dc.contributor.authorPilar Alonso, Maria
dc.contributor.authorCeferina Mamani, Rosalia
dc.contributor.authorGomes, Tania Aparecida Tardelli [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.authorBlanco, Jorge
dc.contributor.authorFrankel, Gad
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-24T13:58:33Z
dc.date.available2016-01-24T13:58:33Z
dc.date.issued2009-08-01
dc.identifierhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.010231-0
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Medical Microbiology. Reading: Soc General Microbiology, v. 58, n. 8, p. 988-995, 2009.
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/31692
dc.description.abstractEnterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E coli (EPEC) translocate, dozens of type III secretion system effectors, including the WxxxE effectors Map, EspM and EspT that activate Rho GTPases. While map, which is carried on the LEE pathogenicity island, is absolutely conserved among EPEC and EHEC strains, the prevalence of espM and espT is not known. Here we report the results of a large screen aimed at determining the prevalence of esPM and espT among clinical EPEC and EHEC isolates. the results suggest that espM, detected in 51% of the tested strains, is more commonly found in EPEC and EHEC serogroups that are linked to severe human infections. in contrast, espT was absent from all the EHEC isolates and was found in only 1.8% of the tested EPEC strains. Further characterization of the virulence gene repertoire of the espT-positive strains led to the identification of a new zeta 2 intimin variant. All the espT-positive strains but two contained the tccP gene. espT was first found in Citrobacter rodentium and later in silico in EPEC E110019, which is of particular interest as this strain was responsible for a particularly severe diarrhoeal outbreak in Finland in 1987 that affected 650 individuals in a school complex and an additional 137 associated household members. Comparing the protein sequences of EspT to that of E110019 showed a high level of conservation, with only three strains encoding EspT that differed in 6 amino acids. At present, it is not clear why espT is so rare, and what impact EspM and EspT have on EPEC and EHEC infection.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSpanish Ministry of Education and Science
dc.description.sponsorshipSpanish Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs [Fondo de Investigacion Sanitaria, Spanish Network for the Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI)
dc.description.sponsorshipAutonomous Government of Galicia
dc.description.sponsorshipFundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)
dc.description.sponsorshipPrograma de Apoio a Nucleos de Excelencia
dc.description.sponsorshipConselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq)
dc.description.sponsorshipMRC
dc.description.sponsorshipWellcome Trust
dc.format.extent988-995
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSoc General Microbiology
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiology
dc.rightsAcesso aberto
dc.titleDistribution of espM and espT among enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia colien
dc.typeArtigo
dc.contributor.institutionUniv Santiago de Compostela
dc.contributor.institutionUniv London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med
dc.contributor.institutionUniversidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
dc.contributor.institutionComplexo Hos Xeral Calde
dc.description.affiliationUniv Santiago de Compostela, Fac Vet, Dept Microbiol & Parasitol, Lab Referencia E Coli, Lugo, Spain
dc.description.affiliationUniv London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Div Cell & Mol Biol, Ctr Mol Microbiol & Infect, London SW7 2AZ, England
dc.description.affiliationUniversidade Federal de São Paulo, Dept Microbiol Imunol & Parasitol, São Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.affiliationComplexo Hos Xeral Calde, Unidade Microbiol Clin, Lugo, Spain
dc.description.affiliationUnifespUniversidade Federal de São Paulo, Dept Microbiol Imunol & Parasitol, São Paulo, Brazil
dc.description.sponsorshipIDSpanish Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs [Fondo de Investigacion Sanitaria, Spanish Network for the Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI): RD06/0008-10181
dc.description.sponsorshipIDSpanish Ministry of Education and Science: AGL-200802129
dc.description.sponsorshipIDAutonomous Government of Galicia: PGIDIT065TAL26101P
dc.description.sponsorshipIDAutonomous Government of Galicia: 07MRU036261PR
dc.description.sponsorshipIDFAPESP: 08/53812-4
dc.identifier.fileWOS000268817900002.pdf
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.010231-0
dc.description.sourceWeb of Science
dc.identifier.wosWOS:000268817900002


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record