Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/45193
Title: Neurohumoral systems in patients with cirrhosis
Authors: Monte, Julio Cesar Martins [UNIFESP]
Casarini, Dulce Elena [UNIFESP]
Parise, Edison Roberto [UNIFESP]
Schor, Nestor [UNIFESP]
Santos, Oscar Fernando Pavão dos [UNIFESP]
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Issue Date: 1-Jan-1997
Publisher: Marcel Dekker Inc
Citation: Renal Failure. New York: Marcel Dekker Inc, v. 19, n. 2, p. 335-342, 1997.
Abstract: In order to evaluate the activation of the sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin systems and antidiuretic hormone release in the setting of chronic liver disease, we studied 30 patients with cirrhosis who presented normal renal function. The cirrhotic patients were divided into two groups according to Child's score: 20 were Child A and 10 Child B. The control group consisted of 10 normal subjects. Blood samples were collected for determination of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), angiotensin I and II (AI and AII), and antidiuretic hormone (ADH), using the method of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). No significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the plasma levels of NE, DA, AI, and AII between the cirrhotic patients and the controls, although the absolute values observed in both groups of cirrhotics were clearly higher than in controls. The ADH levels were higher in Child B in comparison to Child A patients and controls, though this difference was not significant as well. Our results suggest a hormonal activation in cirrhotic patients, even in the early stages of hepatic disease (without ascites). We also noted an increase in ADH levels in Child B patients in relation to Child A and controls, although there was no difference in osmolality, suggesting a nonosmotic ADH release.
URI: http://repositorio.unifesp.br/11600/45193
ISSN: 0886-022X
Other Identifiers: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/08860229709026298
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