Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/43533
Title: Malnutrition, Long-Term Health and the Effect of Nutritional Recovery
Authors: Sawaya, Ana Lydia [UNIFESP]
Martins, Paula Andrea [UNIFESP]
Martins, Vinícius José Baccin [UNIFESP]
Florêncio, Telma Maria de Menezes Toledo [UNIFESP]
Hoffman, Daniel [UNIFESP]
Franco, Maria do Carmo Pinho [UNIFESP]
Neves, Janaina das [UNIFESP]
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2009
Publisher: Karger
Citation: Emerging Societies - Coexistence Of Childhood Malnutrition And Obesity. Basel: Karger, v. 63, p. 95-108, 2009.
Abstract: It is estimated that over 51 million people in Brazil live in slums, areas where a high prevalence of malnutrition is also found. In general, the population of 'slum dwellers' growing at a faster rate than urban populations. This condition is associated with poor sanitation, unhealthy food habits, low birthweight, and stunting. Stunting is of particular concern as longitudinal and cross-sectional studies of stunded adolescents have shown a high susceptibility to gain central fat, lower fat oxidation, and lower resting and postprandial energy expenditure. In addition, higher blood pressure, higher plasma uric acid and impaired flow-mediated vascular dilation were all associated with a higher level of hypertension in low insulin production by pancreatic beta cells. All these factors are linked with higher risk of chronic diseases later in life. Among stunded adults, alterations in plasma lipids, glucose and insulin have also been reported. However, adequate nutritional recovery with linear catch-up growth, after treatment in nutritional rehabilitation centers, can moderate the alterations in body composition, bone density and insulin production. Copyright (C) 2009 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel
URI: http://repositorio.unifesp.br/11600/43533
ISSN: 0742-2806
Other Identifiers: https://www.karger.com/Book/Home/244217
Appears in Collections:Capítulo de livro

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