Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/37761
Title: Stress-induced endocrine response and anxiety: the effects of comfort food in rats
Authors: Ortolani, Daniela [UNIFESP]
Garcia, Marcia Carvalho [UNIFESP]
Melo-Thomas, Liana [UNIFESP]
Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina Celia [UNIFESP]
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Keywords: Anxiety
body weight
chronic stress
comfort food
corticosterone
food intake
Issue Date: 1-May-2014
Publisher: Informa Healthcare
Citation: Stress-the International Journal On the Biology of Stress. London: Informa Healthcare, v. 17, n. 3, p. 211-218, 2014.
Abstract: The long-term effects of comfort food in an anxiogenic model of stress have yet to be analyzed. Here, we evaluated behavioral, endocrine and metabolic parameters in rats submitted or not to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), with access to commercial chow alone or to commercial chow and comfort food. Stress did not alter the preference for comfort food but decreased food intake. in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test, stressed rats were less likely to enter/remain in the open arms, as well as being more likely to enter/remain in the closed arms, than were control rats, both conditions being more pronounced in the rats given access to comfort food. in the open field test, stress decreased the time spent in the centre, independent of diet; neither stress nor diet affected the number of crossing, rearing or grooming episodes. the stress-induced increase in serum corticosterone was attenuated in rats given access to comfort food. Serum concentration of triglycerides were unaffected by stress or diet, although access to comfort food increased total cholesterol and glucose. It is concluded that CUMS has an anorexigenic effect. Chronic stress and comfort food ingestion induced an anxiogenic profile although comfort food attenuated the endocrine stress response. the present data indicate that the combination of stress and access to comfort food, common aspects of modern life, may constitute a link among stress, feeding behavior and anxiety.
URI: http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/37761
ISSN: 1025-3890
Other Identifiers: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10253890.2014.898059
Appears in Collections:Em verificação - Geral

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