Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/34036
Title: Hippocampal plasticity in rats submitted to a gastric restrictive procedure
Authors: Freitas Sonoda, Elisa Yumi de
Silva, Sergio Gomes da [UNIFESP]
Arida, Ricardo Mario [UNIFESP]
Giglio, Pedro Nogueira
Margarido, Nelson Fontana
Real Martinez, Carlos Augusto
Pansani, Aline Priscila
Maciel, Rude de Souza
Cavalheiro, Esper Abrao
Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre [UNIFESP]
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Universidade de São Paulo (USP)
Univ Sao Francisco
Fdn Univ Itaperuna FUNITA
Keywords: Bariatric surgery
Neuron
Parvalbumin
Hippocampus
Brain
Plasticity
Issue Date: 1-Sep-2011
Publisher: Maney Publishing
Citation: Nutritional Neuroscience. Leeds: Maney Publishing, v. 14, n. 5, p. 181-185, 2011.
Abstract: Bariatric surgery has been the most effective therapeutic intervention for morbidly obese patients. However, recent evidence has shown that this procedure may cause serious neurological complications such as Wernicke encephalopathy, depression, and memory impairment. With this in mind, we conducted an experimental study to investigate whether weight-reduction surgery would promote morphological changes in the hippocampal formation, a brain region linked to cognitive and emotional processes. To do so, the present study evaluated the hippocampal expression of parvalbumin interneurons in rats submitted to a gastric restrictive procedure (experimental phytobezoar). Our results demonstrated that rats with gastric-reduced capacity presented a significant increase in the expression of the parvalbumin interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields. These data are the first experimental evidence that restrictive bariatric surgery may alter hippocampal cytoarchitecture.
URI: http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/34036
ISSN: 1028-415X
Other Identifiers: http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1476830511Y.0000000009
Appears in Collections:Em verificação - Geral

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