Obsessive-compulsive symptoms are associated with psychiatric comorbidities, behavioral and clinical problems: a population-based study of Brazilian school children

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dc.contributor.author Alvarenga, Pedro G.
dc.contributor.author Rosario, Maria C. do [UNIFESP]
dc.contributor.author Cesar, Raony C.
dc.contributor.author Manfro, Gisele G.
dc.contributor.author Moriyama, Tais S.
dc.contributor.author Bloch, Michael H.
dc.contributor.author Shavitt, Roseli G.
dc.contributor.author Hoexter, Marcelo Q.
dc.contributor.author Coughlin, Catherine G.
dc.contributor.author Leckman, James F.
dc.contributor.author Miguel, Euripedes C.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-03T14:40:34Z
dc.date.available 2020-11-03T14:40:34Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-015-0723-3
dc.identifier.citation European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. New York, v. 25, n. 2, p. 175-182, 2016.
dc.identifier.issn 1018-8827
dc.identifier.uri https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/58623
dc.description.abstract Pediatric-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is underdiagnosed, and many affected children are untreated. The present study seeks to evaluate the presence and the clinical impact of OCD and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in a large sample of school-age children. In Phase I, we performed an initial screening using the Family History Screen (FHS). In Phase II, we identified an "at-risk" sample, as well as a randomly selected group of children. A total of 2,512 children (6-12 years old) were assessed using the FHS, the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA), the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Data analyses included descriptive and multivariate analytical techniques. 2,512 children (mean age: 8.86 +/- A 1.84 years; 55.0 % male) were categorized into one of the three diagnostic groups: OCD (n = 77), OCS (n = 488), and unaffected controls (n = 1,947). There were no significant socio-demographic differences (age, gender, socioeconomic status) across groups. The OCS group resembled the OCD on overall impairment, including school problems and delinquent behaviors. However, the OCD group did have significantly higher rates of several comorbid psychiatric disorders, including separation anxiety, generalized anxiety, and major depressive disorder, than OCS or unaffected controls. Moreover, the OCD group also scored higher than the SDQ, as well as on each of CBCL items rated by the parent. Our findings suggest that there is a psychopathological continuum between OCS and OCD in school-aged children. The presence of OCS is associated with functional impairment, which needs further investigation in longitudinal studies. en
dc.description.sponsorship National Institutes of Health
dc.description.sponsorship Tourette Syndrome Association
dc.description.sponsorship Patterson Trust Foundation
dc.description.sponsorship Rembrandt Foundation
dc.description.sponsorship Grifols, LLC
dc.description.sponsorship Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation
dc.description.sponsorship Oxford University Press
dc.format.extent 175-182
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer
dc.relation.ispartof European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
dc.rights Acesso aberto
dc.subject Child and adolescent psychiatry en
dc.subject Comorbidities en
dc.subject Epidemiology en
dc.subject Obsessive-compulsive disorder en
dc.subject School-aged children en
dc.title Obsessive-compulsive symptoms are associated with psychiatric comorbidities, behavioral and clinical problems: a population-based study of Brazilian school children en
dc.type Artigo
dc.description.affiliation Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Med, Dept & Inst Psychiat, Rua Dr Ovidio Pires de Campos 785, BR-01060970 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliation CNPq, Natl Inst Dev Psychiat Children & Adolescents, Rua Dr Ovidio Pires de Campos, BR-01060970 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliation Fed Univ Sao Paulo UNIFESP, Dept Psychiat, Child & Adolescent Psychiat Unit UPIA, Rua Pedro de Toledo 590, BR-04038020 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
dc.description.affiliation Univ Fed Rio Grande do Sul, Hosp Clin Porto Alegre, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2350, BR-90035903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
dc.description.affiliation Yale Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Child Study, 230 South Frontage Rd, New Haven, CT 06519 USA
dc.description.affiliationUnifesp Fed Univ Sao Paulo UNIFESP, Dept Psychiat, Child & Adolescent Psychiat Unit UPIA, Rua Pedro de Toledo 590, BR-04038020 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s00787-015-0723-3
dc.description.source Web of Science
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000369325900006
dc.coverage New York
dc.citation.volume 25
dc.citation.issue 2



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