Calls distinguish species of Antbirds (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae) in the genus Pyriglena

Calls distinguish species of Antbirds (Aves: Passeriformes: Thamnophilidae) in the genus Pyriglena

Author Isler, Morton L. Google Scholar
Maldonado-Coelho, Marcos Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Abstract Populations in the genus Pyriglena Cabanis, 1847, commonly known as fire-eyes, are patchily distributed in central South America from the Pacific slope of the Andes to the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Pyriglena populations are currently placed into 12 taxa, only five of which are not isolated from their neighbors by distance, a high mountain range, or a major river. In the Thamnophilidae, taxonomic decisions regarding such allopatric populations have primarily rested on differences in vocalizations, thought not to be learned and to play a key role in the speciation process. When we examined Pyriglena vocalizations in this context, the outcomes revealed substantial diversity in their calls, rather than their songs. They commonly delivered four different types of calls, unusual although not unprecedented in thamnophilids. Diversity in calls rather than songs underscores the need to consider all vocalizations in taxonomic studies. The outcomes support the continued recognition of the White-shouldered Fire-eye Pyriglena leucoptera (Vieillot) and Fringe-backed Fire-eye Pyriglena atra (Swainson) as distinct species, and indicate that, in addition, the currently constituted Pyriglena leuconota should be considered three species: the Western Fire-eye Pyriglena maura (Menetries)

the Tapajos Fire-eye Pyriglena similis Zimmer

and the East Amazonian Fire-eye Pyriglena leuconota (von Spix). We also identify taxonomic uncertainties regarding subspecies that require acquisition of additional data and further analysis.
Keywords speciation
Neotropics
systematics
vocalizations
xmlui.dri2xhtml.METS-1.0.item-coverage Auckland
Language English
Sponsor CNPq
CAPES
FAPESP
CNPq-Brazil
U.S. National Science Foundation (Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant)
FAPESP-Brazil
Whitney R. Harris World Ecology Center (Parker-Gentry Fellowship) at University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL)
Department of Biology at UMSL (Raven Fellowship)
St. Louis Audubon Society
Sigma Xi
Idea Wild
Grant number CAPES
FAPESP
CNPq: 563236/2010-8
CNPq: 309975/2012-3
CNPq: 303713/2015-1
U.S. National Science Foundation (Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant): OISE-0555482
|U.S. National Science Foundation (Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant): DEB 134357
FAPESP-Brazil: BIOTA 2013/50297-0/NSF-Dimensions 1343578
FAPESP-Brasil: 2015/18287-0
Whitney R. Harris World Ecology Center (Parker-Gentry Fellowship) at University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL)
Department of Biology at UMSL (Raven Fellowship)
St. Louis Audubon Society
Sigma Xi
Idea Wild
Date 2017
Published in Zootaxa. Auckland, v. 4291, n. 2, p. 275-294, 2017.
ISSN 1175-5326 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Magnolia Press
Extent 275-294
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4291.2.3
Access rights ACESSO RESTRITO
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000405166200003
URI https://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/53451

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