White Matter Hyperintensities and Their Association With Suicidality in Major Affective Disorders: A Meta-Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

White Matter Hyperintensities and Their Association With Suicidality in Major Affective Disorders: A Meta-Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

Author Grangeon, Maria Conceicao Google Scholar
Seixas, Camila Google Scholar
Quarantini, Lucas de Castro Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Miranda-Scippa, Ângela Marisa de Aquino Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Pompili, Maurizio Google Scholar
Steffens, David C. Google Scholar
Wenzel, Amy Google Scholar
Lacerda, Acioly Luiz Tavares de Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Oliveira, Irismar Reis de Google Scholar
Institution Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA)
Univ Roma La Sapienza
Duke Univ Med Ctr
Univ Penn
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Abstract Introduction: Individuals who have deep and periventricular white matter hyperintensities may have a higher risk for suicidal behavior. There are mixed results in the literature regarding whether unipolar or bipolar patients who have attempted suicide have more deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMH) or periventricular hyperintensities (PVH) relative to those who have no history of suicide attempts.Methods: A meta-analysis of studies examining white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in mood disorder patients with and without a history of suicide attempts was performed.Results: Four studies, including a total of 173 patients who attempted suicide and 183 who did not attempt suicide, were included. A significantly higher number of attempters were found to have WMH than non-attempters. Unipolar depressed patients who had attempted suicide had 1.9 times more DWMH and 2.1 times more PVH than those who did not. Bipolar patients who had attempted suicide had 5.4 times more PVH than those who had not. Taken together, unipolar and bipolar patients who had attempted suicide had 2.8 times more DWMH and 4.5 times more PVH than those who had never attempted suicide.Conclusion: These findings raise the possibility that WMH are biological substrates of symptoms that lead to suicidal behavior. CNS Spectr. 2010;15(6):375-381.
Language English
Sponsor Eli Lilly
Organon
National Institute of Mental Health
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Ache
AstraZeneca
Boehringer Ingelheim
Janssen-Cilag
Moksha8
Roche
Solvay
Wyeth
Pfizer
Date 2010-06-01
Published in Cns Spectrums. New York: M B L Communications, Inc, v. 15, n. 6, p. 375-381, 2010.
ISSN 1092-8529 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher M B L Communications, Inc
Extent 375-381
Origin https://doi.org/10.1017/S1092852900029242
Access rights Closed access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000279618600008
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/11600/43406

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