The effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation on amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization in adult and adolescent mice

The effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation on amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization in adult and adolescent mice

Author Kameda, Sonia R. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Fukushiro, Daniela F. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Trombin, Thais F. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Sanday, Leandro Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Wuo-Silva, Raphael Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Saito, Luis R. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Tufik, Sergio Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
D'Almeida, Vania Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Frussa-Filho, Roberto Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Institution Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Abstract Drug-induced behavioral sensitization (BS), paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and adolescence in rodents are associated with changes in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. We compared the effects of PSD on amphetamine-induced BS in adult and adolescent mice. Adult (90 days old) and adolescent (45 days old) Swiss mice were subjected to PSD for 48 h. Immediately after PSD, mice received saline or 2.0 mg/kg amphetamine intraperitoneally (i.p.), and their locomotion was quantified in activity chambers. Seven days later, all the animals were challenged with 2.0 mg/kg amphetamine i.p., and their locomotion was quantified again. Acute amphetamine enhanced locomotion in both adult and adolescent mice, but BS was observed only in adolescent mice. Immediately after its termination, PSD decreased locomotion of both saline- and amphetamine-treated adolescent mice. Seven days later, previous PSD potentiated both the acute stimulatory effect of amphetamine and its sensitization in adolescent mice. in adult animals, previous PSD revealed BS. Our data suggest that adolescent mice are more vulnerable to both the immediate and long-term effects of PSD on amphetamine-induced locomotion. Because drug-induced BS in rodents shares neuroplastic changes with drug craving in humans, our findings also suggest that both adolescence and PSD could facilitate craving-related mechanisms in amphetamine abuse. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords Age
Amphetamine
Drug abuse
Animal models
Locomotion
Sleep deprivation
Language English
Sponsor Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP)
Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq)
Grant number FAPESP: 05/54956-1
FAPESP: 301742/2010-3
FAPESP: 98/143030-3
Date 2014-08-30
Published in Psychiatry Research. Clare: Elsevier B.V., v. 218, n. 3, p. 335-340, 2014.
ISSN 0165-1781 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Elsevier B.V.
Extent 335-340
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.04.046
Access rights Closed access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000338598000012
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/38112

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