Both human immunodeficiency virus-infected and human immunodeficiency virus-exposed, uninfected children living in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico have similar rates of low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E

Both human immunodeficiency virus-infected and human immunodeficiency virus-exposed, uninfected children living in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico have similar rates of low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E

Author Monteiro, Jacqueline P. Google Scholar
Freimanis-Hance, Laura Google Scholar
Faria, Lidiane B. Google Scholar
Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M. Google Scholar
Korelitz, James Google Scholar
Vannucchi, Helio Google Scholar
Queiroz, Wladimir Google Scholar
Succi, Regina C. M. Autor UNIFESP Google Scholar
Hazra, Rohan Google Scholar
Institution Eunice Kennedy Shriver Natl Inst Child Hlth & Hum
Universidade de São Paulo (USP)
WESTAT Corp
Inst Infectol Emilio Ribas
Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Abstract Our objective was to describe the prevalence of low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Latin American children and a comparison group of HIV-exposed, uninfected children. Our hypothesis was that the rates of low concentrations of these micronutrients would be higher in the HIV-infected group than those in the HIV-exposed, uninfected group. This was a cross-sectional substudy of a larger cohort study at clinical pediatric HIV centers in Latin America. Serum levels of micronutrients were measured in the first stored sample obtained after each child's first birthday by high-performance liquid chromatography. Low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E were defined as serum levels below 0.70, 0.35, and 18.0 mu mol/L, respectively. the Population for this analysis was 336 children (124 HIV-infected, 212 HIV-exposed, uninfected) aged I year or older to younger than 4 years. Rates of low concentrations were 74% for retinol, 27% for beta-carotene, and 89% for vitamin E. These rates were not affected by HIV status. Among the HIV-infected children, those treated with anti retrovirals were less likely to have retinol deficiency, but no other HIV-related factors correlated with micronutrient low serum levels. Low concentrations of retinol, beta-carotene, and vitamin E are very common in children exposed to HIV living in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico, regardless of HIV-infection status. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Keywords beta-carotene
Children
HIV
Retinol
Vitamin E
Language English
Sponsor NICHD
Grant number NICHD: N01-HD-3-3345
NICHD: N01-DK-8-0001
Date 2009-10-01
Published in Nutrition Research. Oxford: Pergamon-Elsevier B.V., v. 29, n. 10, p. 716-722, 2009.
ISSN 0271-5317 (Sherpa/Romeo, impact factor)
Publisher Elsevier B.V.
Extent 716-722
Origin http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2009.10.001
Access rights Closed access
Type Article
Web of Science ID WOS:000272432000005
URI http://repositorio.unifesp.br/handle/11600/31864

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